Ghosts of Record Stores Past and Present

Much of my youth was spent hunting for and playing vinyl. I have created this site to show many of the stores I've visited. Don't try and visit them without calling first, as many of them are no longer with us. If I've posted a picture of a store that you want me to delete please let me know and I'll take it down. To see a particular store just open the photo album with its name on it.

The site also contains links to interesting articles and information on record shops and record collecting and fine musical suggestions and playlists for your listening pleasure (with You Tube links so you can check them out for yourself). The Playlists can be found by scrolling to a separate section of the index under the heading musical resources. And our latest addition, Song of the Day, a glimpse at what's playing on my stereo today, appears there as well.


Monday, October 20, 2014

Song of the Day

Leo Kottke - Louise

Today's Song of the Day is Leo Kottke - Louise.  From 1972's Greenhouse, Kottke is the master of the 12 string guitar, and he does not disappoint here.  While his deep baritone is an acquired taste, he uses it to great effect here on the Paul Siebel song of the sad Louise, a moving saga of a wasted life.
On this video, Kottke plays it by himself, a folk song by a truly accomplished player.



Sunday, October 12, 2014

Mississippi Records, Portland Oregon

Mississippi Records, Portland Oregon
  Open

Made a trip to Portland Oregon this summer, and visited a number of record stores.  Thought Mississippi Records was the best.  A small shop, but a lot of great records (and plenty of traffic in the store). Good selection, many genres and, most important for the discerning record collector, cheap prices. They also sell vintage equipment, and have a record label.  And you can give a listen before you buy.

Portland is a very friendly record store town, with a number of good ones to choose from.  Portland's stores also have chipped in to provide a handy guide to all the local stores.

Have to thank The Vinyl Record Collector Blog, who did a great post on Portland record stores which I used as a helpful guide to my own local tour.  You'll find a link to their article on Portland's record stores, below.

This record store was also listed in a post on Buzz Feed - 27 Breathtaking Record Stores You Have To Shop Before You Die as well as a recent article in USA Today on the Ten Best Record Stores In The USA.  Heady company.

Found some really good records, as you will see below.  Most happy with the copy of Elliot Smith's Either/Or - haven't seen one before or since.

An article informs that Mississippi Records got its name because it was originally on Mississippi Avenue when it was opened.  It isn't now.










Vinyl Record Collector's Blog wrote this most helpful article about Portland's record stores.  Their recommendations were spot on.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Song of the Day

Gomez - Girlshapedlovedrug

Today's song of the day is Gomez - Girlshapedlovedrug.  Sunny alternative pop from 2005's How We Operate, Gomez is a British band (ok, some members now live in the US) which does not feature anyone named Gomez.  Go figure.  But the song is light, airy, and cheerful.


Sunday, October 5, 2014

Song of the Day

Libertines - Can't Stand Me Now

Today's song of the day is the Libertines - Can't Stand Me Now.  From 2004's The Libertines, the band was fronted by Carl Barat and Pete Doherty, and one never knew how long they could stay together.  Two albums worth seems to be the right answer at this point.  This was their most successful single, reaching no. 2 in the UK, and produced by Mick Jones of Clash fame.  Its indie rock, with influences of punk and garage - the guitars are not polished, nor are the harmonies - but the two sing well together, and this song describes their touch and go relationship.  We can only hope for a third go.


Friday, October 3, 2014

Song of the Day

The Rolling Stones - Gimme Shelter

Today's Song of the Day is the Rolling Stones - Gimme Shelter.  Written largely by Keith Richards, it features one of his best guitar riff intros, which is quite a feat given the many great intros he has written.  The chick vocal is by Merry Clayton, who tells quite a story about the recording session.

This is from 1969's Let It Bleed, and to me has always symbolized the end of the 60's - gone are the tight harmonies of mid 60's AM pop, the love power of 1967, and the psychedelia that followed,  It is replaced by dark images of the Vietnam war, and assassinations.  One of my all time favorite Stones' songs, it has always been number one on my personal Stones playlist.

The video below is very interesting, featuring a number of disturbing images from the late 60s set against the song.


Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Song of the Day

The Band - Unfaithful Servant

Today's song of the day is one of my favorite songs by The Band - Unfaithful Servant.  From 1969's classic album, the Band, it is a sad ballad sung by Rick Danko, featuring a great guitar solo from its songwriter Robbie Robertson, and a nice horn chart.  The album generally featured songs about the South, circa the Civil War, as is this one, which tells a tale of an affair between the Unfaithful Servant and his mistress.  The Band was a great, if too short lived group, that featured three separate lead vocalists.  Nowhere are they better represented then on this album, which contains any number of great songs.  The version here is the studio version - they also released an excellent live version of this song on Rock of Ages.


Thursday, September 25, 2014

Song of the Day

Paragons - Got To Get Away

Today's Song of the Day is one of my all-time favorite reggae/rocksteady songs, the Paragons - Got To Get Away aka Man Next Door.  From 1968, this is not Bob Marley reggae, but slightly earlier, with tight harmonies, and a great melody over a grooving bottom bass line.  This is also the band that gave you the original Tide is High, long before it became at hit with Blondie.  This song too has been covered to great effect by others.